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SISKIYOU COUNTY

Welcome to beautiful Siskiyou County. If you are visiting, we hope you enjoy your stay. Just moved in, enjoy what our wonderful county offers. 

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Siskiyou County

HIKING | BIKING

 CLIMBING

Located in Northern California, Siskiyou County is filled with mountainous volcanoes, clear lakes, and evergreen forests. Hiking Trails are plentiful in the surrounding National Forests & Wilderness Areas. 

GREEN HORN PARK | YREKA

The largest park in Yreka, Greenhorn Park has been built around an expansive reservoir sourced by Greenhorn Creek. Trails weave through the surrounding hillside, lapping the lake, while fishermen take advantage of both off-shore and boat fishing. A large picnic area, play structure, open field and a new log cabin information center and restroom are located at Upper Greenhorn. Along the south side of the lake there is old gold mining machinery and a small ghost town. Lower Greenhorn maintains a community soccer field, play structure, large picnic areas, horse-shoe pits, and two restrooms. Lake access is available from Lower Greenhorn and both sections have their own parking areas. Activities at Greenhorn Park include Yreka Youth & Adult soccer during the fall and spring at Lower Greenhorn; cross-country meets, mountain bike races, fishing tournaments; and city-wide festivities for Yreka's 4th of July celebration.

MOUNT SHASTA CITY PARK | MOUNT SHASTA

Headquarters of Mt Shasta Recreation and Parks District is located within the rustic, 26 acre Mt. Shasta City Park, one mile north of downtown Mt. Shasta.  Owned by the District, park facilities include four, scenic picnic areas, a Gazebo, a playground, and public buildings. The land, which ultimately became the Mt. Shasta City Park, was once part of the hunting ground for the Wintun, Maidu, and Okwanuchu Indian tribes and was first crossed by explorers around 1841. Big Springs, designated as the location of the headwaters of the Sacramento River, once contained a water-wheel and was the city’s first source of energy (1901) for generating power to light the local community. The crystal clear water flowing through the park begins its journey high on the snow-covered peaks of majestic Mt. Shasta, flowing through underground lava tubes until finally gushing forth into daylight at the City Park’s headwaters area.

KLAMATH NATIONAL FOREST

The Klamath National Forest covers an area of 1,700,000 acres located in Siskiyou County, Northern California and Jackson County, Oregon. The forest includes five wilderness areas, Marble Mountain, Russian Wilderness Area, Trinity Alps, Red Buttes Wilderness Area and Siskiyou Wilderness Area. In the lower elevations, you'll find park-like stands of Ponderosa Pines, while in the higher elevations, the Douglas fir, sub-alpine fir and mixed conifer stands beg to be explored. There are 200 miles of river system for rafting and 152 miles of wild and scenic rivers in the forest.  In addition, Klamath National Forest offers grazing and timber opportunities as well as 34 campgrounds, hiking, fishing and wildlife viewing. With the Klamath, Salmon and Scott Rivers meandering from one end of the Forest to the other, recreationists have found a playground that can meet the desires of all

MARBLE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS

The Marble Mountain Wilderness is located in Northern California and can be accessed from the towns of Happy Camp, Fort Jones, and Etna. There are over 600 miles of trails in the “Marbles” ranging from steep little used paths, to well-maintained routes, like the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT), provide the only access into the wilderness and travel is restricted to foot or horseback only. All means of mechanical transportation are prohibited in wilderness except for wheelchairs needed by mobility impaired persons. The amount of maintenance a trail receives depends on the use patterns, wilderness preservation objectives, available funds and volunteers. On some trails, don't be surprised if you are forced to make some detours around logs and other obstacles throughout the year. Trail signs in wilderness areas are intentionally kept to a minimum to enhance the wilderness experience, so a good topographical map is a must.

MOUNT SHASTA WILDERNESS

The Mount Shasta Wilderness is a 38,200-acre federally designated wilderness area located 5 miles east of Mount Shasta City in northern California. The US Congress passed the 1984 California Wilderness Act that set aside the Mount Shasta Wilderness. The US Forest Service is the managing agency as the wilderness is within the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. The area is named for and is dominated by the Mount Shasta volcano which reaches a traditionally quoted height of 14,162 feet above sea level, but official sources give values ranging from 14,104 feet from one USGS project, to 14,179 feet via the NOAA. Mount Shasta is one of only two peaks in the state over 14,000 feet outside the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The other summit is White Mountain Peak in the Great Basin of east-central California.

MARBLE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS

The Russian Wilderness is located 7 miles southwest of Etna, California. There are nearly 100 miles of trails in the Russian Wilderness. Some of these trails are steep, little-used paths, while others are well-maintained routes. The amount of maintenance depends on the use patterns, wilderness preservation objectives, available funds and volunteers. On some trails, don’t be surprised if you are forced to make some detours around logs and other obstacles throughout the year. Trail signs in wilderness areas are intentionally kept to a minimum to enhance the wilderness experience, so a good topographical map is a must. Wilderness maps are available online at the National Forest Store or at some of these Klamath National Forest offices.

SISKIYOU WILDERNESS

The Siskiyou Wilderness is located 10 miles north of Happy Camp, California. The Siskiyou Wilderness is cooperatively managed by three National Forests: the Six Rivers, Klamath and Rogue River-Siskiyou. The Siskiyou Wilderness contains many lower elevation settings that can be accessed for recreation year round, providing opportunities typically not available elsewhere. There are over 100 miles of trails in the Siskiyou Wilderness. Some of these trails are steep, little used paths, while others are well maintained routes. The amount of maintenance depends on the use patterns, wilderness preservation objectives, available funds, and volunteers. On some trails, don't be surprised if you are forced to make some detours around logs and other obstacles throughout the year. Trail signs in wilderness areas are intentionally kept to a minimum to enhance the wilderness experience, so a good topographical map is a must.